Stock photography image - A single person balances the yoke over one shoulder

A carrying pole, also called a shoulder pole,[1] a milkmaid’s yoke in the West, an auamo ki’i in Hawaii,and a biǎndan (Chinese: 扁担), is a yoke of wood or bamboo, used by people to carry a load. This piece of equipment is used in one of two basic ways:

A single person balances the yoke over one shoulder, with an evenly distributed load being suspended from each end.
Two people support the yoke by resting it on a shoulder, with the load suspended from the centre of the yoke.
It is still widely used in East Asian countries, and was once also used in the West, in particular by milkmaids. It has been used in the United States, Australia,[3] and Europe.

The basic design is a wood or bamboo yoke, usually tapered.[4] From each end of the yoke, a load of equal mass is suspended. The load may be a basket of goods, pail of milk, water or other liquid, suspended on rope. The load may be hung directly from the yoke, without any rope.

The individual carries the device by balancing the yoke upon one or both shoulders. The Western milkmaid’s yoke is fitted over both shoulders. However, the East Asian type is carried on one shoulder. This allows the wearer to orient the yoke along the path of travel, in order to more easily navigate crowded areas.[4]

 

 

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A single person balances the yoke over one shoulder

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Image ID: 18066
License type: Rights Managed (RM)
Contributor: Hamim CHOWDHURY
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Categories: Business, Lifestyle
Location: Sunamganj, sylhet, BANGLADESH
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Stock photography image - Brown leaf of BAMBOO Brown leaf of BAMBOO
Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants on Earth, with reported growth rates of 100 cm (39 in) in 24 hours.[2] However, the growth rate is dependent on local soil and climatic conditions, as well as species, and a more typical growth rate for many commonly cultivated bamboos in temperate climates is in the range of 3–10 centimetres (1.2–3.9 in) per day during the growing period. Primarily growing in regions of warmer climates during the late Cretaceous period, vast fields existed in what is now Asia. Some of the largest timber bamboo can grow over 30 m (98 ft) tall, and be as large as 15–20 cm (5.9–7.9 in) in diameter. However, the size range for mature bamboo is species dependent, with the smallest bamboos reaching only several inches high at maturity. A typical height range that would cover many of the common bamboos grown in the United States is 15–40 feet (4.6–12 m), depending on species. Unlike trees, individual bamboo stems, or culms, emerge from the ground at their full diameter and grow to their full height in a single growing season of three to four months. During these several months, each new shoot grows vertically into a culm with no branching out until the majority of the mature height is reached. Then, the branches extend from the nodes and leafing out occurs. In the next year, the pulpy wall of each culm slowly hardens. During the third year, the culm hardens further. The shoot is now considered a fully mature culm. Over the next 2–5 years (depending on species), fungus begins to form on the outside of the culm, which eventually penetrate and overcome the culm. Around 5–8 years later (species and climate dependent), the fungal growths cause the culm to collapse and decay. This brief life means culms are ready for harvest and suitable for use in construction within about three to seven years. Individual bamboo culms do not get any taller or larger in diameter in subsequent years than they do in their first year, and they do not replace any growth lost from pruning or natural breakage. Bamboos have a wide range of hardiness depending on species and locale. Small or young specimens of an individual species will produce small culms initially. As the clump and its rhizome system mature, taller and larger culms will be produced each year until the plant approaches its particular species limits of height and diameter. Many tropical bamboo species will die at or near freezing temperatures, while some of the hardier or so-called temperate bamboos can survive temperatures as low as −29 °C (−20 °F). Some of the hardiest bamboo species can be grown in places as cold as USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 5–6, although they typically will defoliate and may even lose all above-ground growth, yet the rhizomes will survive and send up shoots again the next spring. In milder climates, such as USDA Zone 8 and above, some hardy bamboo may remain fully leafed out year
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Keywords: B+W Filter, bamboo, bangladesh, brown lead, C_7D_82575, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, shaded leaf
Location: Sunamgonj, Bangladesh
Price (Small XS): $105.
Photographer: © Hamim CHOWDHURY
Stock photography image - Golden leaf and Bamboo Garden Golden leaf and Bamboo Garden
Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants on Earth, with reported growth rates of 100 cm (39 in) in 24 hours.[2] However, the growth rate is dependent on local soil and climatic conditions, as well as species, and a more typical growth rate for many commonly cultivated bamboos in temperate climates is in the range of 3–10 centimetres (1.2–3.9 in) per day during the growing period. Primarily growing in regions of warmer climates during the late Cretaceous period, vast fields existed in what is now Asia. Some of the largest timber bamboo can grow over 30 m (98 ft) tall, and be as large as 15–20 cm (5.9–7.9 in) in diameter. However, the size range for mature bamboo is species dependent, with the smallest bamboos reaching only several inches high at maturity. A typical height range that would cover many of the common bamboos grown in the United States is 15–40 feet (4.6–12 m), depending on species. Unlike trees, individual bamboo stems, or culms, emerge from the ground at their full diameter and grow to their full height in a single growing season of three to four months. During these several months, each new shoot grows vertically into a culm with no branching out until the majority of the mature height is reached. Then, the branches extend from the nodes and leafing out occurs. In the next year, the pulpy wall of each culm slowly hardens. During the third year, the culm hardens further. The shoot is now considered a fully mature culm. Over the next 2–5 years (depending on species), fungus begins to form on the outside of the culm, which eventually penetrate and overcome the culm. Around 5–8 years later (species and climate dependent), the fungal growths cause the culm to collapse and decay. This brief life means culms are ready for harvest and suitable for use in construction within about three to seven years. Individual bamboo culms do not get any taller or larger in diameter in subsequent years than they do in their first year, and they do not replace any growth lost from pruning or natural breakage. Bamboos have a wide range of hardiness depending on species and locale. Small or young specimens of an individual species will produce small culms initially. As the clump and its rhizome system mature, taller and larger culms will be produced each year until the plant approaches its particular species limits of height and diameter. Many tropical bamboo species will die at or near freezing temperatures, while some of the hardier or so-called temperate bamboos can survive temperatures as low as −29 °C (−20 °F). Some of the hardiest bamboo species can be grown in places as cold as USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 5–6, although they typically will defoliate and may even lose all above-ground growth, yet the rhizomes will survive and send up shoots again the next spring. In milder climates, such as USDA Zone 8 and above, some hardy bamboo may remain fully leafed out year
Categories: Nature
Keywords: 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bamboo, bangladesh, C_5D_83760, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, golden leaf, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, shding, Sigma Lens
Location: Sunamgonj, Sylhet, Bangladesh
Price (Small XS): $80.
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