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Lazy loadA beautiful bright sunflower. This is a nice sunflower. Category - Abstract And Concept. Copyright © Tanzil Gazmir. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMy demo image. This is my demo image for test. Category - Abstract And Concept. Copyright © Tanzil Gazmir. View stock photo.

Lazy loadKids celebrating Language movement day. International Mother Language Day is an observance held annually on 21 February worldwide to promote awareness of linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism. It was first announced by UNESCO on 17 November 1999. Its observance was also formally recognized by the United Nations General Assembly in its resolution establishing 2008 as the International Year of Languages.[1] International Mother Language Day has been observed every year since 2000 February to promote linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism. The date represents the day in 1952 when students demonstrating for recognition of their language, Bengali, as one of the two national languages of the then Pakistan, were shot and killed by police in Dhaka, the capital of what is now Bangladesh. International Mother Language Day was proclaimed by the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in November 1999 (30C/62).On 16 May 2009 the United Nations General Assembly in its resolution A/RES/61/266 called upon Member States "to promote the preservation and protection of all languages used by peoples of the world". By the same resolution, the General Assembly proclaimed 2008 as the International Year of Languages, to promote unity in diversity and international understanding, through multilingualism and multiculturalism. Languages are the most powerful instruments of preserving and developing our tangible and intangible heritage. All moves to promote the dissemination of mother tongues will serve not only to encourage linguistic diversity and multilingual education but also to develop fuller awareness of linguistic and cultural traditions throughout the world and to inspire solidarity based on understanding, tolerance and dialogue. —from the United Nations International Mother Language Day microsit Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, 87314, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24 Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, People. Location - dhaka , Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadThe tractor carrying the clay at Dholghata. Dhalghata is a place with a very small population in the country of Bangladesh which is located in the coastal area of Chittagong Division. Fishing is the main profession most of the people of Dhalghata. Standard of living is very simple but they are very kindhearted. and hospitable. If someone ask for a glass of water, they will bring it and often with something extra to go with the water. Dhalghata is full of natural beauty. But the people have to suffer a lot for natural inclement like storm, rain, flood etc. Keywords - carrying clay, Cloudy day, collecting clay, Dhalghata, landscape, Machine, natural inclement, rainy day, Tractor. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Landscapes. Location - Dhalghata, Chittagong,Bangladesh. Copyright © Indranil Kishor. View stock photo.

Lazy loadSilhouette of happiness. A silhouette is the image of a person, an object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single color, usually black, its edges matching the outline of the subject. The interior of a silhouette is featureless, and the whole is typically presented on a light background, usually white, or none at all. The silhouette differs from an outline which depicts the edge of an object in a linear form, while a silhouette appears as a solid shape. Silhouette images may be created in any visual artistic media,[1] but the term normally describes pieces of cut paper, which were then stuck to a backing in a contrasting colour, and often framed. Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from black card became popular in the mid-18th century, though the term “silhouette” was seldom used until the early decades of the 19th century, and the tradition has continued under this name into the 21st century. They represented a cheap but effective alternative to the portrait miniature, and skilled specialist artists could cut a high quality bust portrait, by far the most common style, in a matter of minutes, working purely by eye. Other artists, especially from about 1790, drew an outline on paper, then painted it in, which could be equally quick. The leading 18th century English "profilist" in painting, John Miers, advertised "three minute sittings",[2] and the cost might be as low as half a crown around 1800. Miers' superior products could be in grisaille, with delicate highlights added in gold or yellow, and examples might be painted on various backings, including gesso, glass or ivory.[3] The size was normally small, with many designed to fit into a locket, but otherwise a bust some 3 to 5 inches high was typical, with half or full-length portaits proportionately larger. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Canon 60D 18-200Mm Canon Lens, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, IMG_7092, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Backgrounds And Textures, Objects, People, Sports And Fitness. Location - Hobigonj, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadSilhouette. A silhouette is the image of a person, an object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single color, usually black, its edges matching the outline of the subject. The interior of a silhouette is featureless, and the whole is typically presented on a light background, usually white, or none at all. The silhouette differs from an outline which depicts the edge of an object in a linear form, while a silhouette appears as a solid shape. Silhouette images may be created in any visual artistic media,[1] but the term normally describes pieces of cut paper, which were then stuck to a backing in a contrasting colour, and often framed. Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from black card became popular in the mid-18th century, though the term “silhouette” was seldom used until the early decades of the 19th century, and the tradition has continued under this name into the 21st century. They represented a cheap but effective alternative to the portrait miniature, and skilled specialist artists could cut a high quality bust portrait, by far the most common style, in a matter of minutes, working purely by eye. Other artists, especially from about 1790, drew an outline on paper, then painted it in, which could be equally quick. The leading 18th century English "profilist" in painting, John Miers, advertised "three minute sittings",[2] and the cost might be as low as half a crown around 1800. Miers' superior products could be in grisaille, with delicate highlights added in gold or yellow, and examples might be painted on various backings, including gesso, glass or ivory.[3] The size was normally small, with many designed to fit into a locket, but otherwise a bust some 3 to 5 inches high was typical, with half or full-length portaits proportionately larger. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Canon 60D 18-200Mm Canon Lens, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, IMG_7086, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Feelings And Emotions, Objects, People. Location - Hobigonj, sylhet, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadA silhouette. A silhouette is the image of a person, an object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single color, usually black, its edges matching the outline of the subject. The interior of a silhouette is featureless, and the whole is typically presented on a light background, usually white, or none at all. The silhouette differs from an outline which depicts the edge of an object in a linear form, while a silhouette appears as a solid shape. Silhouette images may be created in any visual artistic media,[1] but the term normally describes pieces of cut paper, which were then stuck to a backing in a contrasting colour, and often framed. Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from black card became popular in the mid-18th century, though the term “silhouette” was seldom used until the early decades of the 19th century, and the tradition has continued under this name into the 21st century. They represented a cheap but effective alternative to the portrait miniature, and skilled specialist artists could cut a high quality bust portrait, by far the most common style, in a matter of minutes, working purely by eye. Other artists, especially from about 1790, drew an outline on paper, then painted it in, which could be equally quick. The leading 18th century English "profilist" in painting, John Miers, advertised "three minute sittings",[2] and the cost might be as low as half a crown around 1800. Miers' superior products could be in grisaille, with delicate highlights added in gold or yellow, and examples might be painted on various backings, including gesso, glass or ivory.[3] The size was normally small, with many designed to fit into a locket, but otherwise a bust some 3 to 5 inches high was typical, with half or full-length portaits proportionately larger. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Canon 60D 18-200Mm Canon Lens, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, IMG_7077-Flikcf, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Backgrounds And Textures, Feelings And Emotions, Objects, People. Location - Hobgonj, sylhet, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadpeoples demand Life sentence to Kader Molla. peoples demand Life sentence to Kader Molla Keywords - B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_86569, canon, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, EOS 7D 11-16Mm Tokina 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer 50Mm f1.2L II USM 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Feelings And Emotions, Objects. Location - dhaka Bngladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadPeoples voice at Shahbag square , dhaka, Bangladesh. Peoples voice at Shahbag square , dhaka, Bangladesh Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Tokina Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadBangladesh at war against war criminals. Bangladesh at war against war criminals Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_86625, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Tokina Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Architecture And Buildings, Objects, People. Location - dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadmass people at the protest for justice. mass people at the protest for justice Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_86651, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Tokina Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Architecture And Buildings, Backgrounds And Textures, People. Location - dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadpeoples gathering at Shahbag Square. peoples gathering at Shahbag Square Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_86660, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 70-200 Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Architecture And Buildings, Objects, People. Location - Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadProtest at shahbag Square on Valentine day 2013. Protest at shahbag Square on Valentine day 2013 Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_86661, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Architecture And Buildings, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag sQUARE, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadcandle lite at Shahbag Square. candle lite at Shahbag Square Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_86541, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag dahka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadWave of Peoples Protest at shahbag Square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85598, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag, dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadmass agitation against the verdict by war tribunal of Bangladesh. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Co, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheik, 000 and 40, 000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, 000. At the time, 1971, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, 1973, 1991 Ghulam Azam, 1992, 2006, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, 2007, 2009, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, a war criminal of Bangladesh, accused of committing crimes against peace, after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of allege, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, and repatriated to Pakistan, and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators , as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, bangladesh, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, crimes against humanity, despite its name, Dhaka, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions , in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, including former leader Ghulam Azam, including genocide, irrespective of nationality, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] , Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, murder, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, no trials were actually held, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political., or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, Pakistan and India, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah, Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, ranging between 10, rape, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November , Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] Afte, the Indian Army held 92, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, the Minister of Law, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, too, war crimes, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag, Dhaka, Bngladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadmass people on protest for death sentance against Kader Molla. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah"B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85641, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, projnmo chottor, Protest, Shahbag Square. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag, Dhaka, Bngladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest from projomo chottor. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85565, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - daka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadCandle lite protest from Projonmo chottor , shahbag, Bangladesh. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85857, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag, dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadmid night protest at Shabag square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85853, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, deth sentance demanind, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Mass People, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Sigma Lens, tribunal. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag, dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadProjnmo chottor at night. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85845, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag, Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMid Night protest form Projonmo chottor, shahbag, Bangladesh. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says: “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is aA the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006) In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85841, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, mass peole, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Sigma Lens, war crime"Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah". Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbaka, Bangladesh , dhag. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadPROJONMO CHOTTOR AT MID NIGHT. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85833, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbaka, Bangladesh , dhag. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest till mid night form Projonmo chottor. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85829, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag square dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest til mid night at shahbag Square against war crime in BANGLADESH. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85825, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadportrait of a Protest form shahbag square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war. and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971. There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000. At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85819, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Sigma Lens, war crime shahbag square. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadPeoples voice against war criminals in BANGLADESH. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85767, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, shabag Square, Sigma Lens, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbg Square. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMASS PEOPLES VOICE AT SHAHBAG, Bangladesh. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85732, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Sigma Lens, War crime War Criminal. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag Square , dhaka, BANGLADESH. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMass People at shahbag on the right od judgement against the war criminal Kader Mollah. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85727, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, judgement, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Shahbag Square, Sigma Lens, tribunal, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag Square. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest on the trial of crime against Humanity at Shahbag Square,. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85726, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, crewd. protest, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, kader molah, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shabag square, Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMass Peoples protest. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85722, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, shanbag, Sigma Lens, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag, dhaka bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest at shahbag square against war crime at BANGLADESH. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah"B+W Filter, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85720, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Sigma Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - SHAHBAG, DHAKA, BANGLADESH. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest against War crime in Bangladesh. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85718, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Shahbag Square, Sigma Lens, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag, Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadshahbag Square BANGLADESH. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85712, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, MANY PEOPLE, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Sigma Lens, war crime. shahbag square Bangladesh. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - SHAHBAG, dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest from Shahbag Square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85708, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Sigma Lens, war criminal Projonmo chottor. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - shahbag , Dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadprotest at shahbag, square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_5D_85707, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Shahbag Square, Sigma Lens, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shabag, projonmo chottor, dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMass gathering people at Shahbag square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85657, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Projonmo chottor, SHAHBAG, war crime' shabag square, war tribunal. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag, Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadBangladesh on protest against verdict given for kader molla by war tribunal. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85626, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, Kader Mola, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Projonmo chottor, protest. shahbag square, Traibunal., war criem, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag dhka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadSignature giving ceremony form shahbag Square against Molla Kader on his Death sentence by people. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" abdul kader mollah, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85595, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, shahgabg square, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag Projonmo chottor, dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadSignature celebration held at Shahbag Square against war tribunal judgement aginst Kader Mollah,. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85590, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, mass population, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Projonmo choottor, Protest, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag square , Dhaka, bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadPortrait of a Protest at Shahbag Square[Pojonmo chottor] against a verdict on Tribunal judgement against Abdul Kader Mollah,. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Canon 5D Mark II 12-24Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Maa people, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, Shahbag Square, Sigma Lens, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Landscapes, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag Square , , Projonmo chottor, Dhaka Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadProtest from Projonnmo chottor. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85560, canon, Canon 7D Canon 70-200Mm f2.8L IS II 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Protest, razakar, shahabag square, war crime. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Backgrounds And Textures, Objects. Location - shahbag, pjonmo chottor,. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadProtest against Judgement at Shahabag Square. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85578, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Tokina Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Backgrounds And Textures, Objects. Location - Shahbag Square , Dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadA mass crowd protesting at Shahbag Square,[Projonmo chottor]against a verdict given my international war crime tribunal against Abdul Kader Molllah,. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971. The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson. The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political. Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85583, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Crowd, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Projonmo chottor, protest aginst tribunal, Shahbag Chotton, Shahbag Square, Tokina Lens, war criminal tribunal judgement protest. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Backgrounds And Textures, Landscapes, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMass crowd protesting against life time imprisonment war criminal of Liberation war in 1971 to Abdul kader Mollah form the verdict of International war crime tribunal judgement. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973.[79] This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971.[79] The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson.[81] The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political.[89] Keywords - "war criminals, 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85581, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Projonmo chottor, shabag Square, Tokina Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Backgrounds And Textures, Feelings And Emotions, Landscapes, Nature, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag, DHAKA, BANGLADESH. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadCrowd exploration at Shahbag Projonmo chottok, Dhaka Bangldesh. Projonmo chottor shahbag square are the new name of Shahbag, dhaka ,Bangladesh, People gathered here on 9th Feb 2013 for the demand of Death sentence to Kader Mollah , a war criminal of Bangladesh, who joined in a mass killing with the then Pakistan army during the liberation war of Bangladesh In 1971,Present Government of Bangladesh was promised bound t face those war criminal under justices, and the verdict given on 05 feb against Abdul Kader Mollah was a life time imprisonment , and the Mass people of Bangladesh did not accept this verdict, and an on line activist group and bloggers got together in this shahabag square on 06th feb to protest against this verdict, War crimes trial attempts As early as December 22, 1971, the Indian Army was conducting investigations of senior Pakistani Army officers connected to the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka, with the aim of collecting sufficient evidence to have them tried as war criminals. They produced a list of officers who were in positions of command at the time, or were connected to the Inter-Services Screening Committee.[75] On December 24, 1971 Home minister of Bangladesh A. H. M. Qamaruzzaman said, "war criminals will not survive from the hands of law. Pakistani military personnel who were involved with killing and raping have to face tribunal." In a joint statement after a meeting between Sheikh Mujib and Indira Gandhi, the Indian government assured that it would give all necessary assistance for bringing war criminals into justice. In February 1972, the government of Bangladesh announced plans to put 100 senior Pakistani officers and officials on trial for crimes of genocide. The list included General A. K. Niazi and four other generals.[76] After the war, the Indian Army held 92,000 Pakistani prisoners of war,[77] and 195 of those were suspected of committing war crimes. All 195 of them were released in April 1974 following the tripartite Simla agreement between Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, and repatriated to Pakistan, in return for Pakistan's recognition of Bangladesh.[78] Furthermore, there was no obligation on Pakistan to carry out investigations of allegations against the suspects, or to provide reparation to Bangladesh. On July 30, 2009, the Minister of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs of Bangladesh stated that no Pakistanis would be tried under the International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973.[79] This decision has drawn criticism by international jurists, as it effectively gives immunity to the army commanders of the Pakistan Army who are generally considered to be ultimately responsible for the majority of crimes of 1971.[79] The Bangladesh Collaborators (Special Tribunals) Order 1972 was promulgated to bring to trial those Bangladeshis who collaborated with and aided the Pakistan Armed forces during the Liberation War of 1971.[80] There are conflicting accounts of the number of persons brought to trial under the 1972 Collaborators Order, ranging between 10,000 and 40,000.[81] At the time, the trials were considered problematic by local and external observers, as they appear to have been used for carrying out political vendettas. R. MacLennan, a British MP who was an observer at the trials stated that 'In the dock, the defendants are scarcely more pitiable than the succession of confused prosecution witnesses driven (by the 88-year old defence counsel) to admit that they, too, served the Pakistan government but are now ready to swear blind that their real loyalty was to the government of Bangladesh in exile.'[82] The government of Bangladesh issued a general amnesty on November 30, 1973, applying to all persons except those who were punished or accused of rape, murder, attempt of murder or arson.[81] The Collaborators Order 1972 was revoked in 1975. The International Crimes (Tribunals) Act 1973 was promulgated to prosecute any persons, irrespective of nationality, accused of committing crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ‘‘violations of any humanitarian rules applicable in armed conflicts laid out in the Geneva Conventions of 1949’’ and ‘‘any other crimes under international law’’.[83] Detainees held under the 1972 Collaborators order who were not released by the general amnesty of 1973 were going to be tried under this Act. However, no trials were actually held, and all activities related to the Act ceased after the assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in 1975. There are no known instances of criminal investigations or trials outside of Bangladesh of alleged perpetrators of war crimes during the 1971 war. Initial steps were taken by the Metropolitan Police to investigate individuals resident in the United Kingdom who were alleged to have committed war crimes in a Channel 4 documentary film aired in 1995. To date, no charges have been brought against these individuals.[84] On December 29, 1991 Ghulam Azam, who was accused of being a collaborator with Pakistan during 1971, became the Chairman or Ameer of the political party Jamaat-e-Islami of Bangladesh, which caused controversy. This prompted the creation of a 'National Committee for Resisting the Killers and Collaborators of 1971', after a proposal of writer and political activist Jahanara Imam. A mock people's court was formed which on March 26, 1992, found Ghulam Azam guilty in a mock trial and sentenced him to death. A case was filed in the Federal Court of Australia on September 20, 2006 for alleged crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. Raymond Solaiman & Associates acting for the plaintiff Mr. Solaiman, have released a press statement which among other things says:[85] “ We are glad to announce that a case has been filed in the Federal Magistrate's Court of Australia today under the Genocide Conventions Act 1949 and War Crimes Act. This is the first time in history that someone is attending a court proceeding in relation to the [alleged] crimes of Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during 1971 by the Pakistani Armed Forces and its collaborators. The Proceeding number is SYG 2672 of 2006. On October 25, 2006, a direction hearing will take place in the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia, Sydney registry before Federal Magistrate His Honor Nicholls. ” On May 21, 2007, at the request of the applicant "Leave is granted to the applicant to discontinue his application filed on September 20, 2006." (FILE NO: (P)SYG2672/2006)[86] In March 2010, the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) was formed in Bangladesh to hold trials of Bangladeshi citizens accused of involvement in crimes against humanity, including genocide, rape, murder and arson during the 1971 Liberation war. The ICT, despite its name, is of local nature and has had no involvement from the United Nations. It has been criticised by the Human Rights Watch [87] and prominent Western jurists for bias and deficient legal provisions.[88] Charge such as planning to commit crime, murder and torture have been framed against eight members, including former leader Ghulam Azam, of Jamaat-e-Islami party. Three of these have been indicted. The members have termed the charges as political.[89] Keywords - "Shahbag Square" "Projonmo Chottor" "War crime" "Mass Protest" " People's Protest" "War Criminal" "Abdul Kader Mollah" 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, B+W Filter, bangladesh, C_7D_85578, canon, Canon 7D 11-16Mm UWA, Crowd, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, Projonmo chottor, Shahbag Square, Tokina Lens. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Objects, People. Location - Shahbag , dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loada boat at the river Jamuna on a foggy day. Fog is a collection of liquid water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth's surface. While fog is a type of stratus cloud, the term "fog" is typically distinguished from the more generic term "cloud" in that fog is low-lying, and the moisture in the fog is often generated locally (such as from a nearby body of water, like a lake or the ocean, or from nearby moist ground or marshes). Fog is distinguished from mist only by its density, as expressed in the resulting decrease in visibility: Fog reduces visibility to less than 1 km (5/8 statute mile), whereas mist reduces visibility to no less than 1 km . For aviation purposes in the UK, a visibility of less than 5 km but greater than 999 m is considered to be mist if the relative humidity is 70% or greater – below 70% haze is reported citation needed. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, 994014102011, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Landscapes, Nature, Objects. Location - Manik gonj, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadFoggy winter morning. Fog is a collection of liquid water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth's surface. While fog is a type of stratus cloud, the term "fog" is typically distinguished from the more generic term "cloud" in that fog is low-lying, and the moisture in the fog is often generated locally (such as from a nearby body of water, like a lake or the ocean, or from nearby moist ground or marshes). Fog is distinguished from mist only by its density, as expressed in the resulting decrease in visibility: Fog reduces visibility to less than 1 km (5/8 statute mile), whereas mist reduces visibility to no less than 1 km . For aviation purposes in the UK, a visibility of less than 5 km but greater than 999 m is considered to be mist if the relative humidity is 70% or greater – below 70% haze is reported citation needed. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, 991414102011, B+W Filter, bangladesh, boat, canon, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Fog, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head, river. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Landscapes, Objects. Location - Aricha ghat, Manikgonj, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadMisty day and Boat a river Jamuna. Fog is a collection of liquid water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth's surface. While fog is a type of stratus cloud, the term "fog" is typically distinguished from the more generic term "cloud" in that fog is low-lying, and the moisture in the fog is often generated locally (such as from a nearby body of water, like a lake or the ocean, or from nearby moist ground or marshes). Fog is distinguished from mist only by its density, as expressed in the resulting decrease in visibility: Fog reduces visibility to less than 1 km (5/8 statute mile), whereas mist reduces visibility to no less than 1 km . For aviation purposes in the UK, a visibility of less than 5 km but greater than 999 m is considered to be mist if the relative humidity is 70% or greater – below 70% haze is reported citation needed. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, 990914102011, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Landscapes, Nature, Objects. Location - Aricha Ghat, Manikgonj, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.

Lazy loadFog and Landscape. Fog is a collection of liquid water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth's surface. While fog is a type of stratus cloud, the term "fog" is typically distinguished from the more generic term "cloud" in that fog is low-lying, and the moisture in the fog is often generated locally (such as from a nearby body of water, like a lake or the ocean, or from nearby moist ground or marshes). Fog is distinguished from mist only by its density, as expressed in the resulting decrease in visibility: Fog reduces visibility to less than 1 km (5/8 statute mile), whereas mist reduces visibility to no less than 1 km . For aviation purposes in the UK, a visibility of less than 5 km but greater than 999 m is considered to be mist if the relative humidity is 70% or greater – below 70% haze is reported citation needed. Keywords - 0 1 6 1 1 5 9 5 0 3 6, 990714102011, B+W Filter, bangladesh, canon, Dhaka, DSLR, EOS, Fog, Gitzo 3541L Series 3 Tripod, Gitzo Monopod, HamimCHOWDHURY, Hoya Filter, LEE Filter, misty, Neutral density filter Circular Polarizer, Novoflex NQ Ball Head. Categories - Abstract And Concept, Landscapes, Nature, Objects. Location - ARICHA, MANIKGONJ, DHAKA, BANGLADESH. Copyright © Hamim CHOWDHURY. View stock photo.